Survivors: Utah Resources

Utah 2-1-1

Utah 2-1-1 gives Utah residents access to services and resources for mental health, addiction, domestic violence, and abuse, conveniently filtered by county. Resources are also accessible via Utah 2-1-1 smartphone app, text, email, or internet chat.

Utah Crisis Lines

If you are experiencing a medical or psychiatric emergency, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room.


University Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI) Crisis Line: 801-587-3000

Available 24/7, licensed clinicians provide prompt and compassionate crisis intervention, suicide prevention, information, and referrals to individuals experiencing emotional distress and/or psychiatric crises.


UNI Warmline: 801-587-1055

Peer specialists are available daily from 9 am–10 pm to Salt Lake County residents who are not in crisis, but who may be seeking support, engagement, and/or encouragement.

Survivors: National Resources

Coping with Traumatic Events: Resources for Children, Parents, Educators, and Other Professionals

This section of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) website lists SAMHSA publications and resources, resources from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN), resources to address re-traumatization and chronic stress, resources for disaster response professionals, and additional resources.


Highlighted resources:

  • Dealing with the Effects of Trauma: A Self-Help Guide (2002): Provides in-depth information on recovering from a traumatic event; it is geared for those whose reactions may be lingering.
  • In the Wake of Trauma: Tips for College Students (2013): A fact sheet that helps college students cope with the mental health effects in the aftermath of trauma. It explains normal reactions, emphasizes the importance of talking about feelings, and offers tips for coping.
  • Understanding Child Traumatic Stress (2005): This document discusses the cognitive response to danger as it relates to traumatic experiences or traumatic stress throughout all developmental stages, particularly in children. It provides an overview of post-traumatic stress responses and their severity and duration, as well as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following chronic or repeated trauma.

Information for Survivors of Sexual Violence

The Information for Survivors section of the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) features the following subheadings: Where to Get Help, About Sexual Assault, What You Can Do, and After Sexual Assault, as well as sections for Friends & Family, Advocates & Educators, and Media & Press.

Resources for Survivors and the Public Following Disaster and Mass Violence

Disaster and mass violence can lead to injury, death, and psychological distress. Media coverage of these events can also trigger reminders of past events. This page, published by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) links to information to help survivors and loves ones deal with stresses that can come from these types of events.


Highlighted resources:

  • What to Expect in the Wake of Disaster | Qué esperar después de un desastre
    Disasters can cause a range of reactions in direct victims, emergency personnel, as well as in the public at large. There are strategies you can use to cope in the short- and long-term, and effective treatments that can help.
  • What to Expect in the Wake of Mass Violence | Qué esperar después de la violencia en masa
    Mass violence events can cause a range of reactions in direct victims, emergency personnel, as well as in the public at large. There are strategies you can use to cope in the short and long-term, and effective treatments that can help.
  • Help for Survivors in the Aftermath of Disaster and Mass Violence
    Disasters may cause a wide range of reactions in survivors. Most who are affected by disaster will recover on their own with some time and help. After a disaster, you are likely to do better if you feel - or are helped to feel - safe, connected to others, and serene or calm. If a survivor is still having trouble weeks after the disaster, he or she may need further assistance.
  • Self-Care After Disasters
    Disasters affect people who experience and respond to the event. They may cause a number of different stress reactions in those affected. There are many steps you can take to manage stress after a disaster.

Handouts for Disaster Survivors
These handouts, from the Psychological First Aid Manual, cover topics helpful for those who have experienced a disaster. Handouts include:

Survivors: Mobile Apps

Mobile App: SafeUT Crisis Text and Tip Line

The SafeUT Crisis Text and Tip Line is a statewide service that provides real-time crisis intervention to youth through texting and a confidential tip program—right from your smartphone.


Licensed clinicians in our 24/7 CrisisLine call center respond to all incoming chats, texts, and calls by providing:

  • supportive or crisis counseling,
  • suicide prevention,
  • and referral services.

We can help anyone with emotional crises, bullying, relationship problems, mental health, or suicide related issues.


Download on:

Google Play

iTunes / App Store

Mobile App: PTSD Coach

Created by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), The PTSD Coach app can help you learn about and manage symptoms that often occur after trauma. Features include:

  • Reliable information on PTSD and treatments that work
  • Tools for screening and tracking your symptoms
  • Convenient, easy-to-use tools to help you handle stress symptoms
  • Direct links to support and help
  • Always with you when you need it

NOTE: PTSD is a serious mental health condition that often requires professional evaluation and treatment. PTSD Coach is not intended to replace needed professional care.


Also see PTSD Coach ONLINE for desktop use: choose from 17 tools.


Download on:

Google Play

iTunes / App Store

Mobile App: PTSD Family Coach

Living with a family member who has PTSD can be stressful. Created by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), PTSD Family Coach is an app similar to PTSD Coach. PTSD Family Coach provides support for concerned family members of those with PTSD. The app can help you learn about PTSD, how to take care of yourself, and how to manage your relationship with your loved one or children. PTSD Family Coach also has information on how to help your loved one get the treatment they deserve.

Features include:

  • Information about PTSD and how it affects those who care about someone with PTSD.
  • Tips to help families better support a loved one with PTSD, and themselves. The app includes information on how to find counseling.
  • Facts about counseling for individuals or couples managing PTSD in a relationship.
  • Tools to help family members manage stress.
  • Self-created support network of people to connect with when in need.

Download on:

iTunes / App Store

TED: How Childhood Trauma Affects Health Across a Lifetime

Nadine Burke Harris: How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime

It is known that childhood trauma can have long lasting negative mental effects. As explained in this video by Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, it also can have negative long term physical health consequences. Take this TED Ed lesson to learn more and to find resources to build resilience skills to address this health risk. 


Lesson created by Alison Boven using video from TED YouTube Channel

Infographics from Echo Parenting

Echo Behavior Trauma-Informed Flowchart

DOs and DONTs of a Trauma-Informed Classroom

Infographics from SAMHSA/NCTSI: Understanding Child Trauma

Understanding Child Trauma

Recognize the signs of child traumatic stress with this three-page, informative infographic developed by SAMHSA’s National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative (NCSTI). Also available in Spanish.

Understanding Child Trauma: More than You Think

Recognize the signs of child traumatic stress with this one-page, informative infographic developed by SAMHSA’s National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative (NCSTI).

Understanding Child Trauma: Recognize the Signs

Recognize the signs of child traumatic stress with this informative infographic developed by SAMHSA’s National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative (NCSTI).

Understanding Child Trauma: There is Hope

Recognize the signs of child traumatic stress with this informative infographic developed by SAMHSA’s National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative (NCSTI).

Please note:

While every effort has been made to ensure resources shared are safe and reputable, no resource is endorsed or guaranteed by Utah's Trauma-Resiliency Collaborative or its members.  No resource listed is in an any way a substitute for obtaining professional help.

  

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